(Source: beautylish, via cyberfake)

(Source: natures-queen, via levychevy)

(via decisivo)

coolben94:

Dear past self,

When u cut off ur hair mom wont be that mad and you dont have to run away.

From,
Ben (that’s you)

(via gloomyteens)

Timestamp: 1413858485

coolben94:

Dear past self,

When u cut off ur hair mom wont be that mad and you dont have to run away.

From,
Ben (that’s you)

(via gloomyteens)

(Source: yungthot666, via v-a-n-s)

(Source: cataclysmz, via derektyler)

(Source: guink, via pussypoppinwhiteboy)

pocketbeastie:

So one time, one of my guy friends said, “I’m pretty sure I’m straight but I’ve never slept with a man so how do I know for sure if I’m not bisexual or gay” and so he actually went and picked up a guy, had sex with him and after ward he said, “Well that was fun but I appear to be straight.” and just went on with his life without making a big deal about his dip into homosexuality and really, I think everybody should be this relaxed about sexualities

(Source: pocketspoopy, via musictomylove)

(Source: debakesalot, via brendanwtf)

asylum-art:

Levi van Veluw

on Behance |  Facebook

In  the Veneer series, Van Veluw introduces wood as a material in his work. Using different types of wood for different works, Van Veluw bends this relatively rigid material to his will by applying it to a replica of his face. This results in a myriad of cracks and grooves that testify to a notable tension of material and form. Included in this series are two sculptures that play with the viewer’s sense of scale. Veneer III has a height of 150 cm, whereas Veneer IV is merely 12 cm tall.

In the photographic versions of these sculptures, Van Veluw utilises photography’s ability to frame its subject matter and manipulate the viewer into thinking both objects are the same size. Veneer IV has a seemingly rough mosaic texture, yet in reality its surface is very smooth. The viewer, however, unaware of the modest size of the work, is unable to make this distinction.

Natural transfers: This series of work originates from the idea of transforming the face through the use of a material that is already present, rather than using an external element. Simply applying hair to the contours of the head transforms the portrait and the associations conjured up by the materials themselves. Hair becomes a strange and macabre material with a claustrophobic effect, rather than an aspect of human beauty.

For the Light series, Van Veluw covered his head with strips of light-generating foil. Photographed in total darkness, the highly radiant bright blue light produced by this material, allows it to stand out like an autonomous object. The features of Van Veluw’s face have disappeared, only its shape remains discernible through the mass of light strips. Light becomes form and exists independently from its base, the original subject. This ‘invisibility’ of the human subject informs the formal qualities of these images.

Via: artnau

(via levychevy)

Timestamp: 1413812647

asylum-art:

Levi van Veluw

on Behance |  Facebook

In  the Veneer series, Van Veluw introduces wood as a material in his work. Using different types of wood for different works, Van Veluw bends this relatively rigid material to his will by applying it to a replica of his face. This results in a myriad of cracks and grooves that testify to a notable tension of material and form. Included in this series are two sculptures that play with the viewer’s sense of scale. Veneer III has a height of 150 cm, whereas Veneer IV is merely 12 cm tall.

In the photographic versions of these sculptures, Van Veluw utilises photography’s ability to frame its subject matter and manipulate the viewer into thinking both objects are the same size. Veneer IV has a seemingly rough mosaic texture, yet in reality its surface is very smooth. The viewer, however, unaware of the modest size of the work, is unable to make this distinction.

Natural transfers: This series of work originates from the idea of transforming the face through the use of a material that is already present, rather than using an external element. Simply applying hair to the contours of the head transforms the portrait and the associations conjured up by the materials themselves. Hair becomes a strange and macabre material with a claustrophobic effect, rather than an aspect of human beauty.

For the Light series, Van Veluw covered his head with strips of light-generating foil. Photographed in total darkness, the highly radiant bright blue light produced by this material, allows it to stand out like an autonomous object. The features of Van Veluw’s face have disappeared, only its shape remains discernible through the mass of light strips. Light becomes form and exists independently from its base, the original subject. This ‘invisibility’ of the human subject informs the formal qualities of these images.

Via: artnau

(via levychevy)

aninounettear:

Video version of this gif set

Request by dopeandfamous

(via korrastyle)